iV2012 - 16th International Conference

Information Visualisation

10, 11, 12 and 13 July 2012

● LIRMM CNRS Univ. Montpellier II ● Montpellier ● France ●

http://www.graphicslink.co.uk/IV2012/

 

Keynotes Lectures:

1.    Nearly a theory of visualization

Randy Goebel University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 

2.    Visual Investigation: Exposing New Patterns for Fighting Crime

Christopher R. Westphal CEO, Visual Analytics Inc., Maryland, USA

 

3.    A Case-Study in Information Visualization Design

Jessie Kennedy Director of the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation, Edinburgh Napier University, UK

 

4.    Embodied Cultural Archives  : Imagining  New Heritage

Sarah Kenderdine, City University of Hong Kong, Museum Victoria, Hong Kong, China

 

5.    New Grand Challenges in Information Visualization

Georges Grinstein Co-director of its Institute for Visualization and Perception Research, and of its Center for Biomolecular and Medical Informatics University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA

 

<title to be confirmed>

Prof. David Auber, LaBRI , Université Bordeaux I, France

 

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Nearly a theory of visualization

Prof. Randy Goebel University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Abstract

Information visualization is about transforming non-visual information into visual information, to guide humans to draw explanatory or exploratory inferences.   We present the hypothesis that a picture is an inductive hypothesis about some set of foundation data.  Furthermore, we argue that a theory of visualization should guide the composition of transformations to produce a picture that encodes some intended inferential bias when viewed by a human. Components of that theory should help articulate what should be preserved in a picture, what aspects of human visual cognition are best exploited in preferred inference, and how alternative transformations can be evaluated with respect to intended inference.

 

Biography

Text Box:  Randy Goebel is a professor of computing science at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He is currently a principle investigator in the Alberta Innovates Centre for Machine Learning, and has been involved in a broad variety of research areas, from inductive reasoning, optimization, natural language processing, web mining, systems biology, and visualization, in both academic and industrial research projects in Canada, Japan, Germany, Australia, Malaysia, and China.   He has held academic appointments at the universities of Waterloo, Alberta, Tokyo, Multimedia University (Malaysia), and Hokkaido University, and has worked at a variety of research institutes including ICOT (Japan) and DFKI (Germany).

 

 

 

 

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Visual Investigation: Exposing New Patterns for Fighting Crime

Christopher R. Westphal CEO, Visual Analytics Inc., Maryland, USA

 Abstract

This presentation is designed to deliver an interactive and thought compelling set of examples on the use of various visualization and representation techniques for understanding a variety of investigatory domains ranging from financial crimes and money laundering to narcotics-trafficking and counter-terrorism. The presentation provides a number of real-world scenarios that challenge the audience participants to try and interpret the results and explain the outcomes. The presentation emphasizes there are no “right answers” and there are no “wrong answers” only subjective interpretation within the context of the analysis/data. The goal of this presentation is to offer alternative interpretations for obvious situations and complex analytical scenarios. Much of the content presented is based the book, “Data Mining for Intelligence, Fraud & Criminal Detection: Advanced Analytics & Information Sharing Technologies” (CRC Press, December 2008).”

 

Biography

Chris Westphal is co-founder and CEO of Visual Analytics Inc. (VAI), a leader in creating visualization software, information sharing systems, and advanced analytical training. His clients include federal and state/local law enforcement including fusion centers, all major intelligence agencies, the U.S. Department of Defense, and international Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs). Mr. Westphal has authored numerous publications and several books including Data Mining for Intelligence, Fraud & Criminal Detection: Advanced Analytics & Information Sharing Technologies (Westphal, CRC Press, 2008); Data Mining Solutions: Methods and Tools for Solving Real World Problems (Westphal/Blaxton, Wiley, 1998); and Readings in Knowledge Acquisition: Current Practices and Trends (McGraw/Westphal, Ellis Horwood Limited, 1990). He also authored the “Analyzing Intelligence Data: Next Generation Technologies for Connecting the Dots” chapter in Net-Centric Approaches to Intelligence and National Security (Ladner/ Petry, Springer 2005).

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A Case-Study in Information Visualization Design

Prof. Jessie Kennedy Director of the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation, Edinburgh Napier University, UK

 

Abstract

This talk will discuss the importance of design principles and a participatory design approach in order to develop information visualisation tools that effectively support the end-user in their tasks. The talk will focus on a Case Study of the VIPER project - the development of a visual data cleansing tool for Pedigree Genotype Data in collaboration with biologists at the Roslin Institute, Edinburgh. The talk will consider the design process, the importance of design principles, an iterative development cycle with user participation and evaluation in arriving at an effective solution.

 

Biography

Text Box:  Prof. Jessie Kennedy is the Director of the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation at Edinburgh NapierUniversity. Her early research was in database systems and data modeling, which led to work on user-interfaces to databases, visualization of database schema and content and then information visualization with a focus on BioVis. Much of her research in databases and information visualization has been with collaborators from different fields of biology including taxonomy, ecology and genomics. Visualization research has included several new techniques for visualizing multiple Linnaean taxonomies, exploring time-series microarray data, enhancement to parallel coordinate plots, DAG browsers and pedigree genotype visualizations. She has had 11 PhD students complete, has published widely with over 90 peer reviewed publications and has been keynote speaker at several international meetings. She has been programme chair, committee member and organiser of many international conferences and is currently General Co-Chair of BioVis 2012 co-located with VisWeek, Seattle. 

 

 

 

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New Grand Challenges in Information Visualization

- New Theories, New Devices, and New Capabilities -

Prof. Georges Grinstein Co-director of its Institute for Visualization and Perception Research, and of its Center for Biomolecular and Medical Informatics University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA

 

Abstract

There are so many visualization systems today, some web- or cloud-based, some desktop, some totally free, some partially free, and even a few that are part of analysis packages, again with a variety of availabilities. Some are user-programmable. Some are simple to use, some very complex. Some are browser agnostic and some not. Some are 2D and some 3D. Some are written in Javascript and some in languages new to many of us.

 

This is the decade for visualization. It's been around for quite awhile so in some ways it's about time. What made this possible is obvious (if not I'll mention it at the talk). What is making it exciting are all its new instances involving phones, pads, projectors, and bionics.

 

A few years ago I gave the IV Keynote discussing Grand Challenges in Information Visualization. This time I'll discuss new Grand Challenges resulting from new theories, new devices, and new capabilities. 

 

There are still so many problems ... How exciting. Think of this talk as notes to a future visualization researcher.

 

Biography

Text Box:  Georges Grinstein is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, head of its Bioinformatics Program and Co-director of its Institute for Visualization and Perception Research.  He received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Rochester in 1978.

 

His work is broad and interdisciplinary, covering the perceptual and cognitive foundations of visualization, very high-dimensional data visualization, visualization theory, and applications of visualization. In all the emphasis is on the modeling, visualization, and analysis of complex information systems.

 

He has over 30 years in academia with extensive consulting, over 150 research grants, products in use nationally and internationally, several patents, numerous publications in journals and conferences, a new book on interactive data visualization, founded several companies, been the organizer or chair of national and international conferences and workshops in Computer Graphics, in Visualization, and in Data Mining, and has given numerous keynotes.  He has mentored over 25 doctoral students and hundreds of graduate students. He has been on the editorial boards of several journals in Computer Graphics and Data Mining, a member of ANSI and ISO, a NATO Expert, and a technology consultant for various public agencies.

 

For the last eight years he has co-chaired the IEEE InfoVis and VAST contests in visual analytics leading to new research areas. He has developed and taught Radical Design, a course focused on how to develop radical new products instead of evolutionary ones. He is a member of the Homeland Security Center CCICADA, and is co-director of the Open Indicators Consortium that is developing Weave, a web-based interactive collaborative visual analytics system (See iWeave.org).

 

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Embodied Cultural Archives:  Imagining New Heritage

Dr. Sarah Kenderdine, City University of Hong Kong, Museum Victoria, Hong Kong, China

 

Abstract

This presentation examines new paradigms for articulating and enlivening archives as embodied museum experiences. With the rapid growth in participant culture, individualized creative production has overtaken basic access to information as the primary motive for interaction with digital collections. Today, users intuitively exploring and re-applying that data, rather than simply accessing the information, are the main creative expressions of the increasingly available large and diverse datasets. This desire for creative engagement poses significant experimental and theoretical challenges for museums and for visualization researchers.

 

Using heterogeneous datasets representing intangible and tangible heritage, this talk explores interactive applications inside a series of large-scale immersive visualization systems: interactive 3D panoramic 360-degree displays (PLACE; AVIE), hemispherical domes (Media Dome and iDome), 3D panoptic hexagonal viewing systems (Re-Actor, The Virtual Room) and more. Dr Kenderdine and her colleagues are leading research into cultural data sculpting at the Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment, City University of Hong Kong in collaboration with cultural institutions such as Museum Victoria, the Dunhuang Academy and Europeana. This research involves scientific, natural history and cultural collections, archaeological documentation, panoramic photographic, video and ambisonic recordings, and web-based archives. Key works described include the recently created Pure Land: Inside the Magao Grottoes at Dunhuang for the 360-degree stereographic system, AVIE and; the interactive visualization ECloud, based on the World War 1 data from the cultural internet Europeana. This talk engages cultural archives and heritage documentation in contemporary museum discourses and future practices through examining modalities of creative transformation.

 

Biography

Text Box:  Dr. Kenderdine researches at the forefront of interactive and immersive experiences for museums and galleries. In widely exhibited installation works, she has amalgamated cultural heritage with new media art practice, especially in the realms of interactive cinema, augmented reality and embodied narrative. She is a pioneer in panoramic and stereoscopic display systems and content creation. Dr. Kenderdine concurrently holds the position of Special Projects, Museum Victoria, Australia (2003) and is Visiting Assoc. Prof. and Director of Research at the new Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment (ALiVE), City University, Hong Kong (2010-2014). She recently directed Pure Land: Inside the Magao Grottoes at Dunhuang, which premiered in Hong Kong in March 2012. She conceived and curated Ancient Hampi as a permanent museum located at Vijayanagar, Karnataka (commissioned by Jindal Steel Ltd, opened Jan 2012). Recent books include the co-edited, co-authored Theorizing Digital Cultural Heritage: a critical discourse, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007 (third reprint 2010) and PLACE-Hampi: Inhabiting the Panoramic Imaginary of Vijayanagara, Hiedelberg: KehrerVerlag, 2012 (in press).

 

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< Title to be confirmed >

Prof. David Auber, LaBRI , Université Bordeaux I, France

 

<details of abstract shortly>

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